About this Site

A summary of the Opiophilia website:

The purpose of opiophilia is:
(I) To advocate for the right of individuals to use opiates (opioids), also known as narcotic analgesics, without constraint.  This includes both "medical" and "recreational" use as well as any route of administration as determined by the user (oral, intranasal, intravenous, ect.)
(II) To provide accurate information about opiates.
(III) To offer different perspectives on opiate use.  In an era where the use of opiates is viewed with suspicion at best and outright hostility as worst, Opiophilia hopes to de-stigmatize and de-pathologize opiate use by providing the perspective(s) of a user(s), including the good, bad and downright ugly (detoxing from opioids is really, really ugly).
(IV) To document the worst abuses of the "War on (some) Drugs," which is really a war on the people who use the "wrong" drugs.  The truism that the first casualty of war is truth is certainly at work here, as well as the inevitable dehumanization of the "enemy."  As INPUD says, we are people not collateral damage.

The political philosophy of Opiophilia would be best described as classical liberalism, or more commonly known as libertarianism (although there are differences between the two). Three quotes from the 19th century classical liberal John Stuart Mill neatly summarize the philosophy of Opiophilia:

The only part of the conduct of any one, for which he is amenable to society, is that which concerns others. In the part which merely concerns himself, his independence is, of right, absolute. Over himself, over his own body and mind, the individual is sovereign.
The only freedom which deserves the name is that of pursuing our own good, in our own way, so long as we do not attempt to deprive others of theirs, or impede their efforts to obtain it. 

The only part of the conduct of any one, for which he is amenable to society, is that which concerns others. In the part which merely concerns himself, his independence is, of right, absolute. Over himself, over his own body and mind, the individual is sovereign.

We can never be sure that the opinion we are endeavouring to stifle is a false opinion; and even if we were sure, stifling it would be an evil still.

I have thought long and hard about these issues over the years.  I always welcome constructive debate, but please do not contact me to tell me how my views are "sick" or "wrong."  Yes, I want to legalize heroin as well as all other pharmaceutical opioid drugs for all adults (as well as the vast majority of currently illegal drugs).  Perhaps you adhere to the "progressive" notion
that people who use opiates are "diseased" and in need of "treatment," delivered against the "patient's" will if necessary.  I support meaningful treatment for people who have issues with their substance use, as long as the treatment is evidence-based and voluntary.  I reject the notion that drug use, in and of itself, is a disease.

If these views offend you, please look away.



7 comments:

  1. Very forward thinking I feel the same way

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  2. I guess one way to look at it is, drugs are not highly addictive. Drug abuse is highly addictive. A DECENT doctor that prescribes hydrocodone to a patience that follows the instructions exactly can not and will not exhibit the behaviors of an addict because they always have access to their drug and never run out. At some point, tolerances increase and many people abuse their drugs. Then you have the drug seeking behavior and downward spiral. But if you always have the drug, and never increase your dosages, you can live a normal life like my methadone treatment... However, I'm not clueless and I know I'm still addicted. Take away someone's script all of the sudden, they will go through withdrawal like it or not. That's chemical. However, I no longer exhibit the behavior of an "addict" although I am one. The drug seeking addict and the non abusing rx addict really need different labels don't you think?

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    1. The "labels" to which you refer are already present, though not used often.....or often misused/misunderstood. The "addict", which you describe, with the stereotypical behaviors are one set. The people, such as chronic pain patients, who receive a steady monthly supply of their particular drug AND use it only as prescribed, will eventually become CHEMICALLY DEPENDENT. (That's the second "label".) As you alluded to, and as long as they take their 'scrips as prescribed, will eventually develop a tolerance to their particular drug and, in order to control their legitimate pain, they will need to be carefully graduated and/or try different medications.

      As you said, there is a set of behaviors common to "addicts" (read: abusers) that are not generally found in those who are "chemically dependent", have a steady supply, and take their meds as prescribed. They key differences are 1) how much drug an individual consumes, 2) how often one consumes it, and 3) WHY they consume it.

      Everyone must remember that, "A DECENT doctor that prescribes...", is now under intense scrutiny and pressure from the AMA and the state and federal governments. I've also found (from my personal experience working with physicians, as well as my personal drug use problems) that too many doctors and other "addiction specialists" do not truly understand the drugs that they are prescribing or the phenomenon of drug abuse. THAT is a very real problem that needs to be addressed within those communities.

      "Labels" themselves are often a two-edged sword. Take the term "junky" for instance. Many people think of junkies as worthless burdens on society. While there is some truth to this, it is imperative that people start viewing these folks as HUMAN BEINGS rather than "junk" to be discarded. This further exacerbates the psychological burdens that drug abusers already bear, which isn't helpful. On the other hand, many users wear the term junky as a badge of honor. Still, we label everything and everyone. For instance, "unity in diversity". This is all the rage on college campuses across the United States. These folks call for "unity" yet stress/highlight the diverse differences among peoples and instruct society to embrace them. As I stated at the beginning of this paragraph, labels are two-edged swords. If we, as a society, continue to label everything and everyone based on the numerous differences among cultures, include the "drug culture", we run the risk of dividing ourselves, which creates many problems for society. Labels have a tendency to segregate, differentiate, divide, and separate. That isn't always a good thing. This brings me back to the original point: labeling drug abusers and legitimate pain patients who use their 'scrips as prescribed needs to be CLEARLY understood by the ones doing the labeling. They need to be careful not to segregate, differentiate, divide, and separate human beings into the "junk" pile.


      -ThrashMikki

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  3. I hate labels, but I guess we need them in order to describe a person, place or thing. I'm labeled an addict, but if you saw me, you'd never know. Some of us hide it well, but even that doesn't work all the time. I just had one of the worse meetings with a Practioners Assistant, a PA, he was demeaning, rude and degrading to myself. I went in for my first visit and instead of seeing the doctor I was scheduled to see, I saw him. He came in with an attitude, I immediately told him what was going on and the plan I had in mind. He began by telling me my pain was minimal and why I would need such high dosage of meds and what doctor put me on these? As I explained, he'd interrupt me and make me feel defensive. For example: he asked what do you do to help your pain? I replied that when I take a shower I will stretch with the hot water, and before I could finish, he says, "How long do you take showers for? Cuz you know we have s drought?" Ok, would you like to see my water bill, it's down from last year? Come on seriously? Than he made me feel like I wasn't exercising enough, he assumed that I sat all day because I'm not working. Well I can't sit for too long it hurts or stand , or walk. He continued to degrade me and I finally had it. I told him that this was a waste of my time, he agreed and left. I was in tears, it felt like I was raped all over again, that image kept coming into my head, it was horrible. I spoke with the manager and she said sorry, I can schedule you with a different doctor, I declined.
    I told my husband and he was furious, it so happened that they forgot to give me back my DL and my insurance card. My husband went by and picked it up. He then asked to speak with the manager and he basically did all the talking, occasionally with the manager & the general manager shaking their heads yes, in agreement to having the Practioner Assistant writing me a letter of apology within 14 days and if I don't receive it, there will be further action.
    I love my husband, he's my hero and he believes in me and trusts me. It's nice to have someone on my side for once.
    Thanks for reading this and if you have any questions please ask. I've been through a lot and have many different experiences with all sorts of drugs. I also worked in the medical field.
    Garden Godess❤️❤️❤️

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    1. Hi, I stumbled across your post and noticed that the date was recent mom I have a similar situation I'm not to make good trailer is yours I mean it's really really bad and I could really use some info and talk to somebody and you can contact me at 213-210-2211 thank you anytime since I don't sleep

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  4. No doubt some doctors are fuckin seriously stupid assholes..and probably not many but I've had a caring believing and liberal psych AND it was great she took care of me!

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  5. I've found that too many medical professionals, and even "addiction specialists", don't truly understand the drugs that they are prescribing or the disease of drug addiction they are treating. It's a very sad truth that needs to be addressed by the AMA and other professional medical societies.

    Glad to hear that you found a "psych" who could (and would) really help you with your issues. Best wishes to you and yours.


    -ThrashMikki

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